Edith Law

Title: Socio-technical Challenges in Scientific and Medical Crowdsourcing
Speaker: Edith Law, Assistant Professor in Computer Science, University of Waterloo
Date: April 17, 2018
Time: 12:00-1:00pm
Room: Gates-Hillman Complex 6501


Abstract:
Science is increasingly data-intensive; yet, many research tasks involving the collection, annotation and analysis of data are too complex to be fully automated. The idea of research-oriented crowdsourcing is to engage people without formal academic training to contribute or process data towards answering questions. In this talk, I will discuss the variety of socio-technical challenges that arise when designing scientific and medical crowdsourcing systems, and demonstrate through examples various situations where conventional approaches to crowdsourcing fall short.

Bio:
Dr. Edith Law is an assistant professor at the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at University of Waterloo, where she co-directs the Human Computer Interaction (HCI) Lab. Her research focuses on studying how humans can augment and make sense of intelligent systems, as well as developing new curiosity-based strategies for engaging users and encouraging long-term interactions between humans and machines.  Previously, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. She graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in 2012 with Ph.D. in Machine Learning, and holds a M.Sc. in Computer Science from McGill University, and B.Sc. in Computer Science from University of British Columbia. She co-authored the book “Human Computation” and helped create the first AAAI Conference on Human Computation and Crowdsourcing (HCOMP). Her work on games with a purpose, large-scale collaborative planning and curiosity as an incentive mechanism have won best paper honourable mentions at the ACM SIGCHI conference.

Find out more about Edith Law at http://edithlaw.ca/.