Monday, October 19, 2015

Title: Crowdsourcing a Meeting of Minds
Speaker: Michael Bernstein (Stanford HCI)
Date: Tuesday, October 27th
Time: 12-1pm
Room: GHC 6501

Abstract:
Crowdsourcing is an increasingly powerful method where computation guides many amateurs' efforts in order to recreate an expert's abilities. However, across domains from design to engineering to art, few goals are truly the effort of just one person — even one expert. If we can now crowdsource simple tasks such as image labeling, how might computation coordinate many peoples' abilities toward far more complex and interdependent goals? In this talk, I present computational systems for gathering and guiding crowds of experts, including professional programmers, designers, singers and artists. The resulting collectives tackle problems modularly and at scale, dynamically grow and shrink depending on task demands, and combine into larger organizations. I'll demonstrate how computationally-enabled expert crowds can pursue goals such as designing new user experiences overnight, producing animated shorts in two days, and even pursuing novel research.

Bio:
Michael Bernstein is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he co-directs the Human-Computer Interaction group and is a Robert N. Noyce Family Faculty Scholar. His research focuses on the design of crowdsourcing and social computing systems. This work has received Best Paper awards and nominations at premier venues in human-computer interaction and social computing (ACM UIST, ACM CHI, ACM CSCW, AAAI ISWSM). Michael has been recognized with the NSF CAREER award, as well as the George M. Sprowls Award for best doctoral thesis in Computer Science at MIT. He holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Computer Science from MIT, and a B.S. in Symbolic Systems from Stanford University.


Friday, October 9, 2015

Title: Ethical Use of Amazon Mechanical Turk (and Best Practices You Shouldn't Use mTurk Without)
Speaker: Kristy Milland (TurkerNation.com)
Date: Tuesday, October 13th
Time: 12-1pm
Room: GHC 6501

Abstract:
As a Turker, Requester and researcher, Kristy Milland offers insight into use of the AMT platform from all perspectives. If you are looking to use AMT more efficiently and effectively, she will present tips and tricks that can help you become a better Requester. She will also provide insight into who the Turkers are how they work, indispensable if you want to create attractive HITs that get done quickly and correctly, and also if you want to ensure your data isn't corrupted by cheating or bias.

Bio:
Kristy is a community manager on the oldest forum for Amazon Mechanical Turk workers, TurkerNation.com. She helps researchers, journalists and businesses learn more about "mTurk" from the eyes of a worker, and is an invaluable source of insight for how to enable more productive partnerships between requesters and workers (e.g., better HIT design, tips and resources for finding the right workers, understanding what makes “Turkers” tick). Kristy is also a Psychology major at Ryerson University. Her interests are varied, but she is especially intrigued by studies investigating the psychology of mTurk (motivation, linguistics, bias, etc.), or ethnographic work with Turkers.